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Permanent Resident Card Renewal

Permanent Resident Card Renewal

A Green card or Permanent Resident Card allows you to live and work permanently in the United States. The steps you must take to apply for a Green card will depend according to your situation.

You must replace or renew your Green card if:

  • Your Green card is expired or will expire within the next six months;
  • Your previous card was either lost, stolen, mutilated, or destroyed;
  • You have received your card before the age of 14, and you have reached your 14th birthday (unless your card expires before your 16th birthday);
  • You have been a commuter and are now taking up actual residence in the United States;
  • You have been a permanent resident residing in the United States and are now taking up commuter status;
  • Your status has been automatically converted to permanent resident status (this include special agricultural worker applicants);
  • You have a previous version of the Alien Registration Card (for example, USCIS Form AR-3, Form AR-103, or Form I-151, which are no longer valid to prove your immigration status) and must replace it with a current Green Card;
  • Your card contains incorrect information
  • You have legally changed your name or other biographic information on the card since you last received your card;
  • You never received the last card we issued to you.

For conditional permanent residents, the replacement or renewal of the card is subject to points 2, 8, 9, 10 is applicable.

Permanent Resident Card Renewal is denied if there are the following conditions apply to you:

  1. You submitted the wrong Green Card Renewal Form- There is a difference between the regular Green card and a Green card with conditions. If you are a conditional permanent resident, please do not submit the I-90 form for the regular Green card.
  2. You gave incorrect information- Make sure everything on your application is 100% accurate. At the biometric services appointment, USCIS will ask you to re-affirm under the penalty of perjury that the information you provided is complete and accurate.
  3. You submitted an incomplete application- Be careful to read all the instructions. As long as you read and follow the instructions carefully, you shouldn’t have to worry.
  4. You’ve committed a crime- If you have committed a felony or a misdemeanor, the best course of action is to seek advice from a professional before filing to renew your green card. Speaking with an attorney often leads to success.
  5. You were “Ordered Removed”- If you were ordered removed from the United States, then your Green Card application will be most likely denied.
  6. You are considered inadmissible to the United States or are a “Public Charge”- A green card applicant may be found inadmissible as a likely public charge, if it is more likely than not that, in the future, the person will depend on public benefits to meet basic needs.

Talk to our Immigration Attorney Today

If you are looking for a safe and hassle-free renewal of your Permanent Resident Card, look no further than Daniel Albert Law Firm. They specialize in residence and immigration-related legalities and understand all the nuances of the process. Talk to the best lawyers to discuss how we can assist you with your case. Call us at 832-930-3059 to book your consultation or for more information.

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