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How To Buy A Vacation Home – Bankrate.com

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For those who are able, buying a second home is suddenly more appealing, as remote working became  the norm for many professionals during the pandemic. Why not work from the place where you like to vacation — the place where you really want to live?
If you don’t work remotely, a vacation home could still be at the top of your wish list if you have a favorite getaway spot that you visit often. It beats staying in a tiny hotel room or worrying about rental rates each time you want to take a trip.
Whether you’re considering buying a vacation home now or in the future, there are steps you can take to make the process more seamless.
As with any home purchase, buying in a new area requires serious thought and preparation.
If you don’t yet own a home, you can use the vacation home as your primary residence. You could qualify for a home loan with just 3 percent down, assuming the purchase price isn’t greater than the conforming loan limit in your area, and take advantage of homeowner tax benefits.
You can also use the property as your second home, but you’ll likely need at least 10 to 15 percent down to secure a loan. Still, you’ll get the same tax perks as you would if the home was your primary residence.
The vacation home can also be used as an investment property if you plan to rent it out when it’s not occupied to help cover the monthly mortgage payment. You’ll pay more in interest on the loan, though, and the down payment will be much higher.
Before you can purchase a second home, it’s important to understand the costs you might face.
If there’s a mortgage, then there are expenses for principal, interest, taxes and insurance (PITI). In addition to your monthly mortgage payment, there are other expenses associated with vacation property ownership, whether you fund them yourself or by using rental income. These expenses generally include:
To offset costs, vacation property owners may want to consider short-term overnight rentals through platforms such as Airbnb, FlipKey or HomeToGo, as well as in-season rentals through a local real estate broker.
According to the IRS: “If you rent a dwelling unit to others that you also use as a residence, limitations may apply to the rental expenses you can deduct. You’re considered to use a dwelling unit as a residence if you use it for personal purposes during the tax year for more than the greater of: 1. 14 days, or 2. 10% of the total days you rent it to others at a fair rental price.”
However, the very nature of a second home can mean other costs, as well. If you’re 150 miles from the property, for example, who will look after it? Who will check the property in the event of a storm? Will somebody stop by regularly to check for theft or vandalism?
If you’re thinking of buying property by the beach or in a forested area, look into the availability and cost of insurance before you buy. You can’t get or keep a mortgage without required insurance coverage, so make sure it’s both available and at an affordable price.
It’s best to look for a mortgage lender who specializes in second homes in the area where the property is located. The lender will have ready sources of financing and understand the required rules and specifics of the area you’re buying in.
How you finance, for example, depends on where your vacation property is located. For lenders, a second home carries more risk than a primary residence — in the case of a downturn, borrowers are most likely to continue making payments on their primary residence. To offset that risk, buying a second home typically requires more money upfront and the financial capacity to afford two homes, and comes with higher interest rates.
Matters become even more complicated if the property is to be rented. Once rent is in the picture, lenders wonder whether they’re financing a second home or investment property. The difference is important because it’s easier to qualify for second home financing.
Another complicating factor arises when the property has unrelated individuals buying together — the lender wants to be sure that the property will not be devalued by squabbles among owners. The best approach is to have an agreement in writing, created by an attorney, that shows how the property is to be owned and operated.
The list of complications goes on, but the important point is this: An experienced lender with localized knowledge will be your best resource when looking to buy a vacation home.
Once you find a lender, consider your financing options. You may be considering paying the down payment through savings, a cash-out refinance from your primary residence or a home equity line of credit (HELOC). Savings are the best option because you won’t tack on additional debt.
While lenders can be liberal in some ways when financing a primary residence, vacation homes are different. FHA and VA financing are out — they’re only intended for primary residences — but conventional financing is available. Freddie Mac defines a second home as:
Be sure to check vacation home mortgage requirements with different lenders — the financial stress created by the pandemic has caused many lenders to tighten their approval requirements.
Vacation home mortgage rates are typically higher than financing for a primary residence — about 0.5 percent to 1 percent extra. Be sure to search around to find the best second home mortgage rates and terms.
Buying real estate in a new area — or even one you’ve vacationed in for many years — requires expert guidance, so be sure to work with an experienced local real estate professional. They will know not only what properties are available, but why you might prefer one to another, and any local regulations or restrictions.
If considering buying a vacation home, think about how you will use it, how often, and whether or not you will rent it. One of the best ways to get started is to live in a short-term rental in the area. See if you really like the location. Consider schools, shopping, and medical care as required. What are the pluses and minuses? Speak with local real estate brokers and visit open houses. The more you know, the better your chance to get the vacation home of your dreams.
Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.
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